Posts

Online Privacy, Reputation and Identity

The topic of online privacy and how you are represented by digital information has been accelerating over the past few years. In the past six months we have seen a sudden increase in speed as companies on all sides struggle to compete for consumer dollars.

This can be seen in a variety of instances, but mainly in the amount of news coverage it is receiving. Knowing how to identify individuals through online data footprints and having the insight into how they behaviorally act on social networking sites begins looking more and more like Pandora’s Box. You can read about my previous thoughts on reputation management and online privacy or delve into the facts of how online background checks are mixtures of digital espionage and public information.

The sad part of this story is that this business has been around for years… and there are many more invasive technologies being created and utilized by digital companies than you can shake a stick at.

The recent investigative report by the Wall Street Journal on “What They Know” Read more

MyRagan: social media and legal?

This post is in regards to a question @ MyRagan “Can Legal, communicators reach accord on social media?” (read article)

This is a very complex question, mostly formed by the understanding that legal and communication operate under two entirely different models. For the most part, legal is a risk based model and communications are an opportunity model. While segments of channel occasionally have similar goals, they rarely agree on much of anything.

The only real time that legal and communicators will connect is when the two niches reach a like-minded adoption point.

Right now communicators are being thrust through a speedy evolution. I’m sure many would say they are “hanging on to a rocket for one hell of a ride”

Lawyers are often 18 to 36 months behind the rocket, watching as it shoots into the sky and pondering the thought “what are we going to do about all this smoke?” Read more

A small, but very significant fact.

The art of perfecting a business is not in changing the way the entire process functions, but to understand how small functions create bit changes across the enterprise.

Case example: when I was at Verizon, one of my success stories was understanding how a very simple task was currently being implemented thousands of times per day by over 3500 workers. With some technical understanding and business application, I managed to shave off a few minutes from the process. Read more