Enterprise Collaboration Platforms

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wdt_ID Organization Name Organization Name URL Industry Groups Headquarters Location Description CB Rank (Company) Status Founded Date Founded Date Precision Closed Date Closed Date Precision Number of Articles Website Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Contact Email Phone Number Industries Number of Employees Number of Founders Last Funding Date Last Funding Amount Last Funding Amount Currency Last Funding Amount Currency (in USD) Total Equity Funding Amount Total Equity Funding Amount Currency Total Equity Funding Amount Currency (in USD) Total Funding Amount Total Funding Amount Currency Total Funding Amount Currency (in USD) Number of Investors IPO Date Money Raised at IPO Money Raised at IPO Currency Money Raised at IPO Currency (in USD) Valuation at IPO Valuation at IPO Currency Valuation at IPO Currency (in USD) Stock Symbol Stock Symbol URL Stock Exchange Full Description SEMrush - Monthly Visits SEMrush - Average Visits (6 months) SEMrush - Monthly Visits Growth
1 Ripple https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/ripple-labs Financial Services, Internet Services, Other, Payments, Software San Francisco, California, United States Ripple provides one frictionless experience to send money globally using the power of blockchain. 11 Operating 01/01/2012 year 1,58 http://ripple.com http://twitter.com/ripple https://www.facebook.com/pg/ripplepay/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/ripple-labs/ info@ripple.com Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, Financial Services, FinTech, Internet, Payments 501-1000 3 03/04/2020 293.800.000 USD 293.800.000 293.800.000 USD 293.800.000 36 Ripple provides one frictionless experience to send money globally using the power of blockchain. It offers a global real-time payment system that enables banks and financial institutions around the world to directly transact with each other without the n 1,20 1,28 4.85%
2 NYDIG https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/nydig Financial Services, Other, Payments, Software New York, New York, United States NYDIG is a technology and financial services firm dedicated to Bitcoin for institutions, private clients, and banks. 40 Operating 01/01/2017 year 40,00 https://nydig.com/ https://twitter.com/NYDIG_BTC https://www.linkedin.com/company/nydig/ Bitcoin, Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, Financial Services 101-250 2 08/04/2021 100.000.000 USD 100.000.000 405.000.000 USD 405.000.000 405.000.000 USD 405.000.000 11 NYDIG is a technology and financial services firm dedicated to Bitcoin for institutions, private clients, and banks. The firm offers asset management, derivatives, financing, custody, and execution services. NYDIG's platform satisfies the highest regulato 27,80 7,22 433.39%
3 OpenSea https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/opensea Commerce and Shopping, Financial Services, Other, Payments, Software New York, New York, United States OpenSea is a peer-to-peer marketplace for crypto collectibles and non-fungible tokens. 59 Operating 20/12/2017 day 34,00 https://opensea.io/ https://twitter.com/projectopensea https://facebook.com/projectopensea https://www.linkedin.com/company/opensea-io/ support@opensea.io Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, Marketplace 1-10 2 18/03/2021 23.000.000 USD 23.000.000 27.220.000 USD 27.220.000 27.220.000 USD 27.220.000 36 OpenSea is the first (and largest) peer-to-peer marketplace for crypto goods (like eBay for crypto assets), which include collectibles, gaming items, and other virtual goods backed by a blockchain. On OpenSea, anyone can buy or sell these items through a 1,15 464,11 185.67%
4 Republic https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/republic-co Financial Services, Lending and Investments, Payments, Software New York, New York, United States Republic is an investment platform for everyone to invest in private deals, including startups, real estate, video games, and crypto. 154 Operating 01/01/2016 year 15,00 http://republic.co https://www.twitter.com/joinrepublic https://www.facebook.com/joinrepublic https://www.linkedin.com/company/republic.co team@republic.co Crowdfunding, Cryptocurrency, Financial Services, Venture Capital 101-250 4 17/03/2021 36.000.000 USD 36.000.000 64.000.000 USD 64.000.000 64.000.000 USD 64.000.000 14 Republic is an investment platform for everyone to invest in private deals, including startups, real estate, video games, and crypto. Republic was founded by AngelList alumni, the largest online platform for private investing. Since then, the company has 602,46 518,15 0.11%
5 Circle https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/circle-2 Financial Services, Lending and Investments, Other, Payments, Software Boston, Massachusetts, United States Circle is a global internet finance company, built on blockchain technology and powered by crypto assets. 160 Operating 01/01/2013 year 269,00 https://www.circle.com/en/ https://twitter.com/circlepay https://www.facebook.com/pg/circle/ http://www.linkedin.com/company/3509899 info@circle.com Banking, Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, Finance, Financial Services, FinTech, Payments, Personal Finance 251-500 2 30/07/2020 25.000.000 USD 25.000.000 271.000.000 USD 271.000.000 271.000.000 USD 271.000.000 29 Circle provides an online platform that enables users to send money quickly and easily. Circle uses blockchain technology with Circle Pay to ease and improve how users send money. Circle expands its services with a crypto-currency investment product with 255,29 183,78 -3.66%
6 MobileCoin https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/mobilecoin Financial Services, Mobile, Payments, Software San Francisco, California, United States MobileCoin is a cryptocurrency platform that develops P2P payment tokens and digital payment systems for mobile. 233 Operating 01/01/2017 year 20,00 https://www.mobilecoin.com/ https://twitter.com/mobilecoin https://www.facebook.com/pg/MobileCoin-161656367781693 https://www.linkedin.com/company/mobilecoin/ hello@mobilecoin.com Cryptocurrency, FinTech, Mobile, Payments 11-50 1 09/03/2021 11.350.000 USD 11.350.000 41.350.000 USD 41.350.000 41.350.000 USD 41.350.000 8 MobileCoin is a cryptocurrency platform that develops P2P payment tokens and digital payment systems for mobile. It combines privacy, security, and distributed trust with a great user experience. MobileCoin is designed so that a mobile messaging applicati 10,88 3,33 124.82%
7 Chainalysis https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/chainalysis Financial Services, Other, Payments, Software New York, New York, United States Chainalysis provides blockchain data and analysis to government agencies, banks, and businesses around the world. 248 Operating 01/10/2014 day 93,00 https://chainalysis.com https://twitter.com/chainalysis https://www.facebook.com/Chainalysis/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/chainalysis/ info@chainalysis.com 888-254-9670 Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, FinTech, Software 101-250 3 26/03/2021 100.000.000 USD 100.000.000 266.600.000 USD 266.600.000 266.600.000 USD 266.600.000 17 Chainalysis designs and develops anti-money laundering software for Bitcoin businesses. Its products include REACTOR, an interactive and investigation tool that identifies offenders, visualizes data, and shares results with people and organizations, and A 76,37 57,33 -21.48%
8 Robinhood https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/robinhood Financial Services, Lending and Investments, Payments, Software Menlo Park, California, United States Robinhood is a stock brokerage that allows customers to buy and sell stocks, options, ETFs, and cryptocurrencies with zero commission. 266 Operating 01/01/2013 year 1,11 https://www.robinhood.com/ http://twitter.com/robinhoodapp http://www.facebook.com/robinhoodapp https://www.linkedin.com/company/robinhood/ support@robinhood.com Cryptocurrency, Financial Services, FinTech, Stock Exchanges, Trading Platform 1001-5000 2 01/02/2021 2.147.483.647 USD 2.147.483.647 2.147.483.647 USD 2.147.483.647 2.147.483.647 USD 2.147.483.647 54 Robinhood is a stock brokerage that allows customers to buy and sell stocks, options, ETFs, and cryptocurrencies with zero commission. The startup offers equity, cryptocurrency, and options trading, as well as cash management accounts. It also provides a 66,70 41,87 32.84%
9 Paxos https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/paxos Financial Services, Other, Payments, Software New York, New York, United States Paxos is a regulated financial institution building infrastructure to enable movement between physical and digital assets. 345 Operating 01/01/2012 year 142,00 https://www.paxos.com/ https://twitter.com/paxosglobal https://www.facebook.com/paxosglobal/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/paxos/ press@paxos.com press@paxos.com Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, Finance, Financial Services, FinTech 101-250 2 16/12/2020 142.000.000 USD 142.000.000 235.250.000 USD 235.250.000 235.250.000 USD 235.250.000 19 Paxos is re-building the infrastructure of finance. Its mission is to move any assets anywhere, instantly – and therefore democratize access to a new, global, frictionless economy. The Company takes a two-pronged approach of establishing regulatory design 195,47 112,45 23%
10 FalconX https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/falconx Financial Services, Lending and Investments, Payments, Software San Mateo, California, United States FalconX is a cryptocurrency brokerage and digital asset trading platform. 412 Operating 01/05/2018 month 9,00 http://www.falconx.io https://twitter.com/falconxnetwork https://www.facebook.com/thefalconx/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/thefalconx/ info@falconx.io Cryptocurrency, Financial Exchanges, FinTech, Trading Platform 11-50 2 11/03/2021 50.000.000 USD 50.000.000 67.000.000 USD 67.000.000 67.000.000 USD 67.000.000 16 FalconX is a cryptocurrency brokerage and digital asset trading platform. It specializes in the fields of blockchain, cryptocurrency, and fintech. Its platform provideses reliable execution using data science to eliminate slippage and hidden fees. 3,54 3,97 -20.05%
Organization Name Organization Name URL Industry Groups Headquarters Location Description CB Rank (Company) Status Founded Date Founded Date Precision Closed Date Closed Date Precision Number of Articles Website Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Contact Email Phone Number Industries Number of Employees Number of Founders Last Funding Date Last Funding Amount Last Funding Amount Currency Last Funding Amount Currency (in USD) Total Equity Funding Amount Total Equity Funding Amount Currency Total Equity Funding Amount Currency (in USD) Total Funding Amount Total Funding Amount Currency Total Funding Amount Currency (in USD) Number of Investors IPO Date Money Raised at IPO Money Raised at IPO Currency Money Raised at IPO Currency (in USD) Valuation at IPO Valuation at IPO Currency Valuation at IPO Currency (in USD) Stock Symbol Stock Symbol URL Stock Exchange Full Description SEMrush - Monthly Visits SEMrush - Average Visits (6 months) SEMrush - Monthly Visits Growth

If you looked back at my lists five — or even closer to 10 years ago — you’d see a few of the same players, but a lot less maturity and certainly a different focus when it comes to enterprise collaboration. On-premise used to rule, and social features were bolted on — often awkwardly — on top of existing content and document management capabilities, if they even existed at all. Mobile features — or at least useful ones — were nowhere to be found.

Nowadays, the cloud version of enterprise collaboration platforms often takes the front seat. Social capabilities are now usually developed natively from the ground up, using the latestconcepts in social business. And entirely new product categories have taken up the social collaboration mantle, from unified communication to file syncing. Native mobile clients are still in the process of catching up but are improving swiftly. çevrimsiz bonus

That said, although I’ve been steadily inundated with announcements of many new enterprise collaboration tools and services in just the last year alone, for strategic usage by large enterprises only a short list of credible, capable contenders has managed to emerge.  Some of these are well known, while others are mostly familiar to the enterprise customer.

Thus, given the always shifting landscape, I’m regularly asked who the top players are in enterprise social collaboration. The list below is probably as complete as any, given that there are countless niche players and offerings that either have strong feature sets or best-in-class functions, yet are also unlikely to have the resources or skills to support the many detailed needs of large customers any time soon.

Such needs often include extensive customizability for specific business scenarios, deep integration with existing back-end systems, and the ability to support roll-outs that span dozens of countries and legal geographies, with the complex management, administration, security, and governance requirements this inevitably entails.

Enterprise Collaboration Features Today: Cloudy, Social, and Mobile

However, before we explore the today’s enterprise collaboration landscape, I’d be remiss in not pointing out that having made a vendor/product decision is actually as far as one could be from making said choice successful in a given organization. In fact, the top success factors for a new collaborative technology are typically not technology concerns at all.

For example, much has been made of the likely underperformance of a particularly high-profile type of collaboration tool — enterprise social networks (ESNs) — if rollout is conducted without the requisite supporting behavioralcultural, and process changes. We forget at our peril that collaboration is a fundamentally human activity. This implies that any use of enabling technology without taking into account how people actually conduct their work, their inclinations to share information and interact with each other, and in particular how the proposed technology will empower them and alter their collaborative behavior for the better/worse, is bound to disappoint.

That said, workforce collaboration can be greatly boosted by the right enabling technology that 1) effectively collapses time and distance, 2) lays down clear digital pathways that improve team-based outcomes, and 3) makes the right information and people eminently easy to find wherever and whenever work gets done in the organization. While technology alignment with the rest of the organization is always desirable, in reality, the solution that provides the lowest friction and highest enablement of collaboration has the most business value in my experience.

Maturity, Social, Mobile, and Cloud Today’s Collaboration Focus

So with that out of the way, let’s focus on the offerings. Here are the top players today — in alphabetical order by vendor — based on my personal experience in what clients are currently focusing on in their product evaluations and comparisons. Please note this list is anecdotal and not exhaustive, but I believe it covers the majority of the big players in the space today. I’d also observe that there is a distinct tendency of the large established companies to buy up the small collaboration vendors once they have any measure of success, so buyer beware.

Box. One of the better funded enterprise collaborative startups, this comparatively recent pure play cloud offering focuses on files as the center of the collaborative experience. Offering content management and online workspaces, Box offers many different ways of interacting with files while offering the enterprise-grade security that IT departments insist on these days. Mobile access is very good with apps on iOS and Android devices. Box also offers off-the-shelf integration with Google Apps, Salesforce, and NetSuite, as well as an open API for custom integration needs. Box has had a great ride over the last couple of years and has rapidly becoming one of the standards for enterprise file-based collaboration in the cloud.

Citrix Podio. Lesser known than many of the big marquees in the enterprise collaboration space, Citrix has long made a name for itself with a variety of communication and network-based solutions for enterprises. Podio is a workspace-based collaboration environment that emphasizes project management, along with all the usual social networking features. CRM, recruiting, and event management are also core use cases. Like some of the other top offerings, Podio has an app store where businesses can find and select templates for other types of collaborative business processes. Vitally, Podio also allows collaboration to occur across the firewall with customers and business partners, a hot emerging capability that lets companies access some of the highest value collaborative scenarios. The Podio mobile app is one of the most highly rated enterprise collaboration clients in the iOS App store. One of Podio’s big strengths is Citrix’s extensive experience with cloud and enterprise networks, but the company has its work cut out for it to grow beyond existing Citrix customers.

Cisco WebEx Social. The enterprise social network formerly-known-as Quad has recently been renamed, but remains one of the most comprehensive available, with rich support for communities, e-mail, and content management. WebEx Social also stands out from the pack with strong support for and integration with unified communications. It also has some of the strongest mobile capabilities overall. While Cisco has clearly been challenged in arriving later in the game than some of its top competitors, it remains one of the more compelling offerings, though like Podio, it’s much more likely to be found at committed Cisco customers than elsewhere, for now.

IBM Connections. At this point probably the pre-eminent grande dame of enterprise collaboration, IBM Connections has gone through a long process of evolution and maturity to arrive today as a shoe-in on the short list of almost any major enterprise collaboration selection effort. IBM Connections goes well beyond the basic enterprise social network and offers full-fledged integration with the entire collaborative experience, from e-mail and content management to unified communication and all the standard office productivity suites. Connections offers the extended feature set you’d expect from one of the most mature and advanced enterprise collaboration suites available including social analytics, intranet integration, and APIs. As you’d expect, mobile support is excellent as well. The sheer size and technology footprint of Connections might be daunting for anyone but the large enterprise, but then again, Connections is about as capable as enterprise collaboration tools come these today.

Jive Social Business Platform. The largest player in the top-end of the space that is purely dedicated to enterprise social networks, Jive has carved out a sizeable and respectable niche with large customers and others that appreciate its refined and sophisticated offering. Built from the ground up for social, the Jive social platform plays in the usual strategic areas while also emphasizing what few of the others do: A deliberate focus on structured business outcomes in CRM, customer care, and employee engagement. Jive has an app store with a growing number of applications to make it possible to engage in many kinds of work activity right in the collaborative environment. The platform also has strong integration features, a growing set of gamification capabilities, and increasingly sophisticated mobile apps.

Microsoft SharePoint & Yammer. In SharePoint, Microsoft has the largest presence of any collaborative tool in the enterprise, except possibly e-mail, where it also is a top player. However, SharePoint has long been a platform for document management, and as such has been slow to evolve the latest collaborative features involving social networking, file syncing, and lightweight messaging. While it can be augmented with platforms like Newsgator, which add many of these ‘missing’ capabilities, Microsoft acquired Yammer last year as a solution to address some of these shortcomings on its own. While Microsoft has recently published quite a bit of information on how it intends to reconcile and integrate the two platforms, both of which have extensive market penetration, the jury is out on exactly how effective the effort will ultimately be. That said, most companies already have one or both platforms and any enterprise collaboration strategy has to be clear on how these are involved, or not. That said, both are strong platforms for their core competencies, though mobile support for SharePoint remains quite poor, and Yammer is still lacking in enterprise sophistication. Cloud support for SharePoint is being offered through Office 365, while Yammer has long been a cloud native and has very good mobile support.

Salesforce Chatter. The social features added to Salesforce in the form of its Chatter platform were intended as a path towards creating a Facebook for the enterprise, at least originally. Chatter has a strong presence in the marketplace and I occasionally hear from IT managers that are feeling pressure from their sales teams to deploy the product more broadly. Chatter began as a functional but basic enterprise social network in the cloud in its first incarnation, to a much stronger contender more recently with the release of Chatter Communities which allows employees, partners, and customers to collaborate together, a key use case as I noted above. Chatter has a growing range of social networking capabilities, including workflow support, IM, file sharing, and smart conversation filters. Capable mobile clients are available as well.

SAP Jam. A tough one to decide to incorporate on this list, SAP Jam is the newest entrant on this list, which I covered in detail here last October. Yet I believe it’s one that many organizations will at least consider, given its pedigree, ambition, and support from one of the companies that most understands social when it comes to applying to their business (I profiled the impressive SAP Community Network as the opening case study of my recent book on social business.) In addition to the usual offerings, SAP Jam includes pre-designed situated solutions for high value business use cases in marketing, sales, HR, customer care, and others.

How To Choose A Collaborative Platform: Meet Business Needs

Given the growing number of good choices at a wide variety of price points and feature sets, I see most selection efforts for enterprise collaboration solutions ultimately employ one of two lenses to make the choice:

1) A desired set of target features that’s believed to be desired within the organization such as document sharing, microblogging, news feeds, file syncing, or mobile knowledge access, along with supporting technical capabilities like application integration, search, administration consoles, and governance features.

2) A more abstract set of business requirements selected to address a list of long-standing functional challenges like poor collaboration, better access to knowledge, reducing travel costs, or speeding up business processes.

In today’s BYOD and BYOA world, workers can easily access the apps that meet their point needs, even if it fragments the information landscape of the enterprise. However the latter of the two lenses above is a perspective from which businesses can still have the most impact by bringing in technology solutions that solve specific and ongoing issues for a broad swath of the business.

However, having participated in a number of enterprise collaboration platform showdowns over the years, I can attest to this: Having a clear understanding of a) how your workers will actually use the tools, b) maximizing their impact through deliberate design thinking when it comes to enabling key features, and then c) testing the tools under these conditions is the only way to have a good chance to find the right fit. Otherwise employees will increasingly self-serve with the countess free and easy-to-use applications they find that really solve their problems.

After all, recent data show that the top enterprise collaboration tool today may actually be Facebook, based on real-world usage. I continue to encounter HR managers who have found it’s hard work to stop this without a compelling alternative. Instead, companies are likely far better off investing real time in finding the solutions that truly meet their workers needs for collaboration while creating the right strategic changes to the business to make success likely. Then, and only then, driving adoption in a far more receptive and effective environment.

1. Tibbr

Developed by TIBCO Software, Tibbr is optimized for seamless use on your desktop or mobile device. The profile layout is similar to Facebook, with space to list professional skills, past projects and people you’ve worked with. You can follow topics, people, apps and project updates, then see who else follows similar subjects.

Tibbr is an Enterprise Social Network

My favorite Tibbr feature is the “Insights” tab, which provides an overview of what’s happening within your network in a visually dynamic, infographic-style layout.

Enterprise apps like Salesforce, SAP and Oracle are integrated on the social network, as well as personal apps like Box, Evernote and LinkedIn (accessible through the App Marketplace).

Tibbr recently integrated third-party meeting and video chat service, so you can use Skype, WebEx or Google Hangouts directly through the Tibbr interface.

Companies that use Tibbr include Macy’s, iHealth and InterPortPolice.

Cost: The price isn’t listed on the site, but you can request a demo or contact sales directly.

2. Jive

Jive is a mobile-ready ESN with similar profile functions. You can follow people, groups and topics on the site. One of the coolest features on Jive is “Recommendations.” It’s similar to Facebook’s “People You May Know,” but instead, shows profiles of people you should get to know in your company, based on shared interests and related areas of expertise. Its “Structured Outcomes” feature also makes it easy to tell co-workers which tasks are complete, and which still need to be finished.

Companies that use Jive include T-Mobile, PWC, UBM and Critical Mass.

Cost: The Essentials package costs $12 per user/month, and the Essentials+ package costs $18 per user/month. The Enterprise package simply says: Call for pricing.

3. Yammer

Yammer is another ESN optimized for desktop and mobile use. Company networks are private, so you must have a verified company email in order to join. The UI is also similar to Facebook, with status updates, pages and “follow” capabilities.

Yammer is a private social media network.

When Microsoft purchased Yammer in 2012, it added a feature that detects employees’ emotions by analyzing sentiments expressed on the network.

Companies that use Yammer include Shell, 7-Eleven and Razorfish.

Cost: Signup for the basic network is free; the Enterprise Network is $3 per user/month;Sharepoint online + Yammer is $4 per user/month; and Office 365 + Yammer is $8 per user/month. (Yammer’s pricing page lets you chat in real time with reps, who respond quickly to any inquiry you may have.)

4. SocialCast

VMware’s SocialCast is another ESN optimized for mobile or desktop. It provides a centralized workplace and communication center for employees. You can create public or private groups, share documents and manage your projects via SocialCast.

A notable feature is the “Task Timeline,” which displays which tasks you need to do today, and which are queued up for tomorrow. The Socialcast Org Chart also helps employees keep track of company hierarchy.

Companies that use SocialCast include Nokia, Humana and SAS.

Cost: Contact the SocialCast sales team for pricing plans.

5. Convo

Convo, as one might deduce from the name, is an exceptional communication tool. With support for over 33 file types, it’s easy to drop pictures, videos and links into conversations. It has the same profile, status updates, news feed and group-control as most ESNs and is optimized for desktop and mobile use.

One of the coolest features of Convo is that you can manually highlight parts of an image or link and discuss the microcontent in a thread.

Companies that use Convo include The Next Web, TechCrunch and the Oxford Leadership Academy.

Cost: The Basic package for 20 users or less is free; the Premium package for up to 100 users is $9 per user/month; and the Enterprise package requires you to contact a sales rep.

6. Kaltura

Kaltura is an open source video platform with both Internet and Intranet functionality. A bit like a corporate YouTube, Kaltura hosts live or on-demand videos of anything from employee training to product demonstrations. These videos can be posted publicly or privately behind your company’s firewall.

Kaltura’s MediaSpace simplifies video search and browsing and lets you edit and share videos easily.

Kaltura is an open-source intranet and internet video-hosting site.

On June 12 and June 13, 2013, Kaltura hosted its Video Summit for Enterprise and Education, a conference that discussed video use in both business management and MOOCs.

Companies that use Kaltura include Best Buy, Coldwell Banker and Texas Instruments.

Cost: Kaltura’s video solutions start at $499/month, but they recommend contacting the sales department for a personalized quote.

7. Chatter

Created by Salesforce, Chatter is optimized for mobile and desktop use and is easily integrated with any social app. Chatter Connect provides a social network experience, while Chatter in Apex allows creates custom Chatter experiences in Salesforce. With Salesforce Communities, customize your networks — a separate community for sales, clients and employees all in one centralized location, for streamlined communication.

Companies that use Salesforce include GE, Commonwealth Bank and NBC Universal.

Cost: With one CRM license, use Chatter for free with up to 5,000 employees. Chatter Plus integrates social collaboration and costs $15 per user/month.

8. Zyncro

Zyncro is a social (and mobile) business platform with an array of customization options for internal collaboration and communication. Through the site, you can create file management, task assignments and execution, and a contacts directory.

Spanning 28 nations, Zyncro affords opportunities for a wide variety of businesses and customers, from retail and finance to insurance and NGO sectors.

Cost: A five-person trial is free, but in order to get a quote for your enterprise or business community, you must contact a sales rep.

9. Socialtext

Socialtext is an SaaS with social capabilities. The Socialtext dashboard is a customizable homepage, where employees can add widgets like Wikipedia, Twitter, Gmail, Salesforce or Slideshare. You can fill out a profile with your contact info, project history and skills. The news feed function pulls both internal and external activity, so employees stay up-to-date and on the same page.

Socialtext also has content creation capabilities reminiscent of WordPress. Craft wiki pages, online spreadsheets and blogs — comparing drafts is easy.

Socialtext’s 360 feature takes connection recommendations a step further by creating a social graph that maps people with similar interests, skills and passions.

Companies that use Socialtext include Blue Man Group, SouthEastern and Getty Images.

Cost: For pricing plans, contact the Socialtext team.

10. Connections

IBM’s Connections is another SaaS system that runs on your mobile or desktop computer. The software has a homepage function with a social stream, profiles, communities, mail, bookmarks, file-sharing and discussion forums. Blogs and wiki pages also make it easy to stay on the same page with co-workers.

Most notably, the service also allows for painless integration with Microsoft applications, such as SharePoint, Windows Explorer, Outlook and Office.

IBM doesn’t name the companies that use Connections, but it does mention a few clients: “a leading health insurance network with millions of members and more than 3,000 employees,” “a training institute for continuing education with over 100,000 members,” and “the world’s largest suppliers of building materials, with over 12,000 employees worldwide.”