Posts

Background Checks Part II – discrimination, privacy, accuracy and compliance

As a professional, many of us are troubled by the notion that we may be judged by our actions, our history, our lifestyle, or the people we associate with.

In some cases we go through great lengths to create separation between our personal or public lives, even creating multiple silos within our personal and professional lives to create harmony and goodwill in our conversation.

Using myself as a personal example: I am the person who can have almost any conversation on almost any topic. I have a thick skin that is supported by a multi-faceted personality with humor, morality, and respect at its core. I have had the benefit of dealing with life and death crisis situations, personal tragedy, and industry changing business problems. With that said, I can talk to almost anyone on any subject.I know when to admit to things I do not know, and when to ask the hard questions.

The social media world creates a strange track history of my interactions with these conversations. I have a personal poetry site that doesn’t have a thing to do with my business life, and like every other person: my friends have a myriad of personal beliefs ranging from extreme religion to activism.

With such a varied personal and professional background, the web audience at large could dig into any particular silo and eventually find something they do not agree with… but they can also see a breadth of experience. Read more

Start-up tips, venture funding 101

I don’t talk too much about the business of making businesses: but having been through the hurdles a few times and having sat on almost every side of the table, I wanted to share some of my lessons learned.

First off… money is nice, but it isn’t the end goal of venture capital or growing a gigantic business. The experience and talent VC’s can bring to a start-up can be immense (or completely void) and the biggest asset usually becomes the investor’s network.

So from my viewpoint, the three main assets in order of importance:

A small, but very significant fact.

The art of perfecting a business is not in changing the way the entire process functions, but to understand how small functions create bit changes across the enterprise.

Case example: when I was at Verizon, one of my success stories was understanding how a very simple task was currently being implemented thousands of times per day by over 3500 workers. With some technical understanding and business application, I managed to shave off a few minutes from the process. Read more