Posts

Understanding Page One Results

It wasn’t that long ago that the concept of searching the web gave a visualization of finding the desired information in a like-minded format with our ‘search term’ at the top of the page and results listed out in a pretty basic format. Every business wants the sacred ‘1st page result’ on search engines (hopefully earning the fabled revenue that comes with it.)

The search engine struggle also became like a big game of poker: some businesses risked everything on the wrong hand only to have search giants such as Google ‘change the game’ on them. This made progress and expertise in winning the game a difficult proposition (when the house knows the players are winning, it wants to change the rules…)

As search engines like Google began indexing more and more information, the format and availability of non-text information became available. The influx of different types of information give search engines a continual excuse to change the game. It leads to a constant shift of how page one results appear; having visual elements inserted into the mix, along with information that was ‘related’ to the search.

Understanding the game

If we take this basic concept and then visualize the fact that people are simply creating millions of pieces of data every single day, search engines have an infinite playground to test different formats and functionality.

The shift of different formats affects the functionality that businesses rely on for promotional and brand exposure. Every shift creates a gap in learning and opportunity. Depending on the nature of your service and profession, how search engines present your information alongside of competitors and related businesses can drastically alter the way you need to coordinate your online presence. Read more

What is Syndicated Media?

SYNDICATED MEDIA
In the digital world, anything and everything will end up in places you never expected: copies of white papers will be indexed by search engines, aggregation sites will attempt to categorize your information, and even employee data will reside on hundreds of different sites.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT
For the past decade it has become generally accepted that having certain information on services like Google and Yahoo exposes your information to internet users who would otherwise have never seen it. When understood properly; every piece of owned, bought, and earned media can be resurrected as syndicated media. Read more

How to write a resume, interactive personal branding 101

How to write a resume? This was once a simple question.

In the past, a resume really had one purpose… to get our information in front of a specific set of eyes (the hiring manager) and detail our work capabilities.

In today’s marketplace we are now faced with having a “digital presence” that is collected from dozens of sources across the web: ranging from news stories, personal updates from social networks, friends placing information about us online (images, video, commentary), and aggregation sites collecting our information.

As a contributor to many executive campaigns over the years, the basis for writing a resume has remained very consistent: create  a bio, a summary, and an impact “selling” statement.
Trim the fat, but ad enough detail to get your introduction made.

Rather than write your own resume, my recommendation to standout for professionals is to have your network write the resume.

How to Write a Resume ?
It is really simple:
take these five questions Read more

Protecting your reputation

One of the reasons that my research is so intensive is that the very root element of business I appreciate most is reputation. Unfortunately (and fortunately) reputation affects every business element, crossing over dozens of different objectives and dealing with contamination from both personal and professional sources.

Needless to say, it is incredibly complex.

To help detail how many moving pieces it deals with, the following bullet list provides some of the typical classifications these elements fall into. Read more