Posts

Understanding Page One Results

It wasn’t that long ago that the concept of searching the web gave a visualization of finding the desired information in a like-minded format with our ‘search term’ at the top of the page and results listed out in a pretty basic format. Every business wants the sacred ‘1st page result’ on search engines (hopefully earning the fabled revenue that comes with it.)

The search engine struggle also became like a big game of poker: some businesses risked everything on the wrong hand only to have search giants such as Google ‘change the game’ on them. This made progress and expertise in winning the game a difficult proposition (when the house knows the players are winning, it wants to change the rules…)

As search engines like Google began indexing more and more information, the format and availability of non-text information became available. The influx of different types of information give search engines a continual excuse to change the game. It leads to a constant shift of how page one results appear; having visual elements inserted into the mix, along with information that was ‘related’ to the search.

Understanding the game

If we take this basic concept and then visualize the fact that people are simply creating millions of pieces of data every single day, search engines have an infinite playground to test different formats and functionality.

The shift of different formats affects the functionality that businesses rely on for promotional and brand exposure. Every shift creates a gap in learning and opportunity. Depending on the nature of your service and profession, how search engines present your information alongside of competitors and related businesses can drastically alter the way you need to coordinate your online presence. Read more

What is Syndicated Media?

SYNDICATED MEDIA
In the digital world, anything and everything will end up in places you never expected: copies of white papers will be indexed by search engines, aggregation sites will attempt to categorize your information, and even employee data will reside on hundreds of different sites.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT
For the past decade it has become generally accepted that having certain information on services like Google and Yahoo exposes your information to internet users who would otherwise have never seen it. When understood properly; every piece of owned, bought, and earned media can be resurrected as syndicated media. Read more

Protecting your reputation

One of the reasons that my research is so intensive is that the very root element of business I appreciate most is reputation. Unfortunately (and fortunately) reputation affects every business element, crossing over dozens of different objectives and dealing with contamination from both personal and professional sources.

Needless to say, it is incredibly complex.

To help detail how many moving pieces it deals with, the following bullet list provides some of the typical classifications these elements fall into. Read more

Search Engine Conquesting, the brand battlefield

This article is originally from August 2007. I decided to dust it off, simply because it was correct two and half years ago and continues to highlight an important trend regarding how search engines and businesses interact online. Once you understand this concept, several other more advanced ideas regarding online reputation and brand management begin to have a clearer picture (such as search reputation and brand value)

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

When most people think of the word “conquesting” they probably think of roman soldiers claiming Europe or Celtic barbarians ravaging peasant villages. While the term may invoke memories of epic stories, it is also beginning to see a revival in the online marketplace. Conquesting in regards to marketing is when a competitor purposely places advertising and brand message side by side with similar businesses. In the real world conquesting has been around for years in grocery stores where like-minded products are side by side or in retail malls where cell phone booths are packed within arms reach of one another. In print media conquesting often took the form of advertisers purposely buying strip ads near larger competitive ads in an attempt to leverage the competitors larger ad. Read more