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Background Checks, Pandoras Box, digital espionage, or public info?

What if you could take anyone you know and ask a question about them, without them knowing it? The digital world has created a virtual version of Pandora’s box, a secret treasure trove of information and insight that only a few people know how to use. If you had keys to this vault of information, if someone gave you a map to nearly infinite knowledge… would you use it?

Probably not.

In reality, every person who lives in the modern world has access to such information. The simple fact is that many of us are completely overwhelmed by the amount of information we need to sift through… having few or non-existent methods for qualifying how we spend our time sifting through it.

It is a simple fact that hundreds of millions of people use web-enabled cell phones, and that 3G / 4G units are quickly covering the world (on June 24th, Qualcomm CEO Paul Jacobs stated the worldwide 3G users surpassed one billion.)

Consider your network.

Imagine how much information exists for you online, created both by you, your family, your friends, your co-workers, your competitors, and everything that has been done in the past.

Now think about the people you care about: your family and friends. Multiple the information that you have online by the number of people you consider “close to you”

Now ask about Pandora’s Box.

If Pandora’s Box (the web) could answer these questions… would you want to know? is it your right to know?

  • Where was my spouse last Saturday night?
  • How many parties did my employee attend in 2010?
  • Is my new business partner in any risky groups?
  • What did this public employee do for fun yesterday?

These are all incredibly complex questions that could be rooted in entirely reasonable viewpoints… but they all define the “double edged sword” of information freedom and personal privacy. We know more about each other than we ever did… and that information is being used by our our family, our friends, the public, and our enemies.

In a perfect world many of us probably wouldn’t complain too much about our family and friends using Pandora’s box, but seeing as the profit of our personal information is being driven by the public and by our enemies… Pandora’s box has been arguably flung open by the loving term “social media.”

What do you think of Pandora’s Box?

READ MORE: Background Checks Pt II – Discrimination, privacy, accuracy and compliance.

Marchex, love em or hate em?

As many of my readers and professional contacts know, I’m a stickler for ethics and a big supporter of entrepreneurial ideas (both locally and globally.) I also have a pretty intensive background in using new ideas in the recruiting space… and yet I’m going to step out on a limb and stir the pot a little.

A little background story: Several of my professional contacts are out of work and have asked me to for professional insight and assistance landing a good home. In this personal venture I turned to various job tools ranging from recruiter blogs, twitter headhunters, and the traditional job board.  In my exploration I wandered across a new recruiting pitch from Marchex that I hadn’t seen before.  Read more

How to write a resume, interactive personal branding 101

How to write a resume? This was once a simple question.

In the past, a resume really had one purpose… to get our information in front of a specific set of eyes (the hiring manager) and detail our work capabilities.

In today’s marketplace we are now faced with having a “digital presence” that is collected from dozens of sources across the web: ranging from news stories, personal updates from social networks, friends placing information about us online (images, video, commentary), and aggregation sites collecting our information.

As a contributor to many executive campaigns over the years, the basis for writing a resume has remained very consistent: create  a bio, a summary, and an impact “selling” statement.
Trim the fat, but ad enough detail to get your introduction made.

Rather than write your own resume, my recommendation to standout for professionals is to have your network write the resume.

How to Write a Resume ?
It is really simple:
take these five questions Read more

Avoiding the Startup Deadpool

One of the biggest recommendations I can give to any entrepreneur is very simple: learn from other peoples mistakes.

In the world of forward thinking minds, one of the best places to learn is the Startup Deadpool (the place where some once great ideas now lay dead and are barely remembered.) Read more

Seattle Social Media, a solution to my own workflow

To anyone in the Seattle social media scene, it is no great surprise that I have had personal conversations with hundreds (if not thousands) of like-minded entrepreneurs, business executives and coffee addicts. As someone who has been “in the trenches” of social media since before it was social media,  the massive amount of information and resource tracking skills that are integrated into my business life is pretty massive.

To help streamline my own calendar and prevent schedule conflicts, I decided to revamp my old seattlesocialmedia.com site that was used as a personal test site and provide a useful tool to the community focused around three problems I personally experienced Read more