Posts

4 Top Post on 123 Social Media

Some of my best posts go unnoticed by different portions of my readers:this recaps my most popular posts over on 123 Social Media (which is getting a shiny new look as I write this) and details some the best portions.

Example Social Media Policies – this is a collection of over fifty different policies from all over the globe. While reading social media policies doesn’t sound terribly sexy or interesting… reading five to ten different policies from various companies really sheds a light on how professionals see the risk and benefits associated to social media. The originating article of corporate social media policy was also popular (but didn’t get read by 25k+ people)

Social Media for Demographics – this is honestly one of my favorites (I say that with full realization of being a metrics guy…) as was one of the first times enough information was collected in one place to compare some annual numbers from early 2009. Now that the data is somewhat old, the information it contains is an even better benchmark for seeing where trends are moving (it also led to the on-going collection of data that led to the 2010 demographic report.)

101 Twitter Ideas, Tactics, and Strategies – a collection of some of the “best ideas” on the web regarding how to use Twitter. Looking back at the information, I can personally/professionally say I’ve collected over ten of thousands of followers and hundreds of good contacts using the ideas in this article.

Social Media Training, Five Must Read reports for Big Business – if you had to read nothing else about social media, these five whitepapers would be critical assets for any professional. Each one is stuffed with great tidbits of insight and actionable information.

If you have another favorite article, please let me know. I’m basing the above articles on traffic volumes, commentary and web activity.

Evolving your business trends… don’t slide down the curve

I apologize if I this article jumps a bit, but I will endeavor to tie it back together…

There is this great statement in the Harvard Business Review that details bullet points of my own thoughts around my eight year old son and an alarming problem in big business:

“When a 12-year-old can gather information faster, process it more efficiently, reference more diverse professionals, and get volunteer guidance from better sources than you can at work, how can you pretend to be competitive?..” Read more